Do You Need To De-stress?

Is it just me or is life a lot more stressful than it used to be? Nowadays, it seems that everywhere I go I find people who are tired, frustrated, upset, worried, etc. Life can always throw you a curve-ball that is stressful. But when you add a pandemic … stress hits a whole new level. And stress on its own isn’t healthy. In fact, stress worsens most pre-existing or Chronic conditions. If you have been feeling the pressure of stress, you aren’t alone. According to the American Institute of Stress, about 77% of the population regularly suffers from the symptoms of stress.  Let’s talk about that …

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Stress can negatively impact your relationships at school, home and/or work. A bad day at the office somehow leads to an argument with your spouse/partner? Or vice-versa? You know what I’m talking about. Stress can also weaken your immune systems, increase your blood pressure, increase blood sugar levels, increase pain, etc. The more you allow it to consume you, the worse you are going to feel. That’s a given. And that makes you more vulnerable to other things, i.e. anxiety, depression, colds, viruses. Thankfully, we can do things to reduce the stress in our lives.

If you feel that stress is getting the best of you, try these simple yet effective ways to de-stress:

  • Limit Social Media/Broadcast Media. Yes, social media can be fun. Unfortunately, it’s also a stressor for millions. So limit your use of it. Binge-watching news and talk-shows can also have a negative impact. Select one or two reputable news broadcasts or shows, watch them and move on. You want to be informed — NOT stressed-out.
  • Meditation/PrayerIt just takes a few minutes to close your eyes and focus on something positive or calming. Likewise, reading from a devotional or engaging in silent prayer has the same soothing results.
  • Breathing Deeply. For five minutes, sit upright with your eyes closed. Slowly inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth.
  • Slow Down. Look around you. Admire flowers growing, a butterfly fluttering, etc. Eat slower and enjoy your food. Live in the moment and do so fully. When you focus on your senses, you should feel less tense.
  • Reach Out. Talk to others, face-to-face or on the phone. Share what’s going on with a friend, co-worker, spouse/partner before it becomes a bigger issue. It can provide helpful support and input.
  • Pull-out The Heating-Pad. Just 10 minutes of warmth on your neck and shoulders can allow your body to decompress and ease tension.
  • Laugh Out Loud. Enjoy a good joke or a funny story … at home, in the locker-room, or the break-room. Watch a 30-minute sitcom with your significant other. Laughing lowers your body’s stress hormone (cortisol) and boosts brain chemicals (endorphins) that lighten your mood.
  • Exercise. All forms of exercise, even low-impact ones like yoga and walking, can relax you. It can ease depression and anxiety. 
  • Listen To Music. Soothing music, from classical to nature sounds, can lower your blood pressure and heart-rate. You can even create your favorite playlist for relaxing!
  • Keep A Gratitude Journal. Carry it with you. Set it by your bed and read it every night. Think of the things you are most grateful for, in your life. The people and things that make your life special.

 

Last but not least, realizing that you need to de-stress isn’t a sign of weakness … or age … or illness. It’s a preventative health measure. One that we all can benefit from. So, don’t be reluctant to try it. The healthier that we are, the happier we are. That leads to the more productive we are and so on. And it’s all good. So go for it!

 

 

 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hope-relationships/201504/6-natural-ways-de-stress

https://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/blissing-out-10-relaxation-techniques-reduce-stress-spot#3

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress/art-20046037

https://www.simplypsychology.org/stress-immune.html

https://www.stress.org/daily-life

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/social-media-mental-health-negative-effects-depression-anxiety-addiction-memory-a8307196.html

*Photo by Jared Rice in Unsplash

Chronically Ill In An Outbreak

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is here. If it hasn’t reached your state, province, territory, or nation, odds are that it will arrive soon. If you or a loved one has a Chronic illness, i.e. Cancer, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Asthma, COPD, Heart disease, Lupus, etc., you probably already know that you have a weakened immune system. You’ve probably been told to get a flu shot, take a good vitamin, etc. There’s a reason for that. Because you are chronically ill, you are at a greater risk for colds, flu, viruses, etc., than the general population. That means you are more vulnerable, in this current outbreak. I won’t insult your intelligence by telling you to ignore the news, cross your fingers, or hope for the best. I will encourage you to be proactive. So, let’s focus on that …

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According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Coronavirus is spread from person to person. It is also believed that people are most contagious, when they are sickest (showing the most symptoms). It may also be possible to contract the virus from infected surfaces or objects.  When you go out, maintain social distances (3 feet or 1 meter) between yourself and anyone who is sneezing or coughing. Wash your hands (for at least 20 seconds). If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Our hands touch many things. So, please, keep yours clean. If possible, use tissues to sneeze or cough into. Then, promptly dispose of the tissue. Wear a mask. Good respiratory hygiene is not only helpful to you, but to others who are around you. Stay home if you don’t feel well. That’s a no-brainer. If you think or know that you have been exposed to COVID-19, don’t wait for symptoms to appear … contact your doctor immediately. And if you have a fever, persistent cough, or difficulty breathing … contact your doctor immediately!

Many have rushed to buy face-masks. Initially, the CDC did not recommend that people who are well wear a face-mask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases. But masks should be worn by all individuals. Healthcare providers and caregivers who are in close-contact with Coronavirus patients should also wear them. We now know that, routine face mask use (in every scenario) by 50% or more of the population reduced COVID-19 spread. In other words, it allows us to flatten future disease waves and that means less stringent lock-downs.

As easy as this sounds, buy some Disinfecting Wipes for use at home and at work. Use them. It only takes a few minutes to wipe down surfaces, doorknobs, etc. Buy some facial tissues for home and work. Use them. Make healthy dietary choices and thoroughly cook meat and eggs. Rest. Wash your hands. Wear a mask. Practice social distancing. Exercise some commonsense and good judgement. Last but note least, manage your Chronic disease.

There are no guarantees with the Coronavirus. We cannot ignore it. Nor can we allow ourselves to be consumed by the fear of something that may never happen. But we can take precautionary steps to help prevent it. And that’s more than a wish — that’s action!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/symptoms.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-01/tl-pss_1012920.php

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51674743

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-masks-study/widespread-mask-wearing-could-prevent-covid-19-second-waves-study-shows-idUSKBN23G37V?utm_source=share&utm_medium

*Photo by Free To Use Sounds on Unsplash

What Is “Heart-Healthy”?

On this last post for Heart month, I thought it might be prudent to revisit the term “Heart-Healthy”. What exactly does it mean? Sadly, in many instances it has become a marketing gimmick. So, please, don’t be fooled by the usage. As a consumer, eating “Heart-Healthy” means that you need to read the labels before you buy.  Being “Heart-Healthy” means that you should adopt healthy eating habits, i.e. vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy, fish, legumes, nuts, etc. It means you should limit sweets, desserts, sugary drinks, red meats and processed foods. You should also reduce your consumption of saturated fats, sodium and sugar. Make nutrient-rich choices, instead! You’ll be glad that you did!

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Canned foods are high in sodium. Did you know that? Frozen foods are too.  In fact, about 70% of our sodium intake comes from packaged and prepared foods. While these products are convenient, they aren’t necessarily the healthiest of choices. Know the “Daily Value” of the products that you are buying. Think of it as a tool to finding healthier choices. Read the Nutrition Facts Label. It’s also important to pay attention to serving-size. The accepted rule-of-thumb for sodium is that 5% DV or less per serving is low. And 20% DV or higher is much too high. 

The American Heart Association as well as the American College of Cardiology endorse the DASH diet (which limits sodium and reduces blood pressure) and the Mediterranean diet (which has been proven to improve cardiovascular health). Both can be found in the reference links, below. Both are considered “Heart-Healthy”. And fresh is always best!

This isn’t difficult. We aren’t talking quantum physics, here. We are talking about sensible, healthy eating. Sensible portions. Wise choices. It all leads to living “Heart-Healthy”. If you glean nothing else from this post, remember this, Heart-Healthy is a way to love yourself. And you are worth it!

 

References Links:

https://health.gov/our-work/food-nutrition/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines/guidelines/

https://sodiumbreakup.heart.org/top_25_foods_that_add_the_most_sodium_to_your_diet

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/dash-diet/art-20048456

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/mediterranean-diet/art-20047801

https://www.fda.gov/food/nutrition-education-resources-materials/use-nutrition-facts-label-reduce-your-intake-sodium-your-diet

*Photo by Caroline Attwood on Unsplash

Giving The Gift Of Life …

My cousin was diagnosed with Juvenile Diabetes, before he started kindergarten. He tried to exercise, to eat healthy, to take his medication, etc. For the most part, he did well. He enjoyed sports, went to college, built a career, married, raised a family, etc. Nothing, including Diabetes, held him back. But, by age 46, his luck had changed. It was clear that he was losing the battle with heart disease. Doctors told Allen that he needed a heart transplant to survive. The news fell on our family like a ton of bricks. Months later, he received the news — a match had been found. For him, as with thousands of others, it was truly the gift of life.

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At any given time, approximately 4,000 people are awaiting a heart transplant.  Some are children. Even infants have undergone the surgery. Why they need a new heart varies, from patient to patient. But the severity of their health situation is the same. They are all fighting to survive.

After decades of research and medical advances, heart transplant surgery still carries risks. But it also has a good success rate. About 85% of patients will survive the first year, after surgery. And 75% will live at least 5 years. Younger patients (age 55 & under) have a 50% chance of surviving a decade or longer. Most of these recipients (over 80%) return to normal living, i.e. working, swimming, cycling, running, etc. As I said, it is truly the gift of life.

If you are already an organ donor, let me say, “Thank you.” For those who may be curious about organ donation, or interested in becoming a donor, please visit https://www.donatelife.net/types-of-donation/heart-donation/ for more details. You can register to become a heart donor, in just a few minutes. It isn’t difficult. If you choose to become an organ, eye, and tissue donor, your decision can make a difference in the lives of more than 75 people! Over 90% of Americans support organ donation. Unfortunately, less than 60% are registered to be a donor. Let’s change that …

Make February of 2020 the month that you chose to give the gift of life!

 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/heart-transplant

https://www.hopkinsallchildrens.org/Patients-Families/Health-Library/HealthDocNew/When-Your-Child-Needs-a-Heart-Transplant

https://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-failure/qa/how-long-can-you-live-after-a-heart-transplant

https://www.mayoclinic.org/departments-centers/heart-transplant/sections/eligibility/oec-20212191

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/younger_patients_more_likely_to_live_a_decade_or_longer_after_heart_transplant

Heart Donation: Everything you need to know

*Photo by Melissa Askew on Unsplash

Indulge Yourself …

It’s Valentine’s Day. And whether you are madly in love or not, it is permissible to indulge yourself. It’s my humble opinion that you must love yourself first, before you can love others. But how do you indulge yourself and remain “heart healthy”? Hmmm … Well, first, you must think moderation. Second, you need to consider the options that are available. If you want to avoid food indulgences, purchase flowers … jewelry … perfume …  game tickets … concert tickets … a spa day, etc. If you would like to gift an edible to yourself or a loved one, then consider dark chocolate!

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Dark chocolate, eaten in moderation, is a sweet splurge for anyone — even Diabetics. Chocolate is filled with beneficial minerals, i.e. iron, copper, magnesium, zinc. And the cocoa in dark chocolate also contains antioxidants known as flavanols and polyphenols. These antioxidants guard against heart disease and stress. And dark chocolate has anti-inflammatory properties, too. This helps guard against inflammation in your body. Many diseases are negatively impacted by inflammation, i.e. some Cancers, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Lupus, etc. A study conducted in 2016 found a positive association between eating dark chocolate and cognitive performance. In other words, improved brain functioning. And that’s beneficial to anyone with Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s.

Does it have to be dark chocolate? Well, the darker the chocolate the healthier it is. Look for 70% dark chocolate or higher. This has the most beneficial properties. Does it have to have nuts or berries? No. But nuts and berries also contain heart-healthy properties. So, if you are thinking red, ripe strawberries dipped in dark chocolate, go for it. Store your chocolate in an air-tight container at approximately 65-70 degrees (chocolate-covered berries will require refrigeration). It’s Valentine’s — have some fun with it. Show you care. Indulge yourself or the one you love with dark chocolate!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-chocolate.html

https://blogs.webmd.com/diabetes/20180508/yes-you-can-eat-chocolate-with-type-2-diabetes-heres-how

Dark Chocolate

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666316300459

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324747.php#brain-function

*Photo by Jessica Johnston on Unsplash

 

 

 

Viral Heart Disease

Yes, it’s winter. It’s also flu season. But those symptoms that have you down may not be the flu. It could be viral heart disease, also known as Myocarditis. This inflammation of the heart muscle is usually caused by a virus. However, it can also be caused by a drug reaction or an inflammatory condition, i.e.  Mycoplasma, Streptococcal (Strep), Staphylococcal (Staph), Borrelia, HIV, Herpes, etc. And it can strike even the healthiest of people. This includes children.

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In its early stages, Myocarditis can have no symptoms. As it worsens, it presents itself much like the flu, i.e. fatigue, fever, sore throat, headache, muscle aches, etc. You may also experience shortness of breath, chest pain, or fluid-retention. And left untreated, it can lead to serious complications, i.e. heart failure, heart attack, stroke, arrhythmias, or sudden cardiac arrest.

If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms, or those mentioned in the links provided, you need to see a doctor. If you have had an infection and begin to experience these symptoms, notify your doctor. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Room for help. Myocarditis may be considered rare, but it is nothing to take for granted.

Over 3M cases were diagnosed, in 2017. This isn’t a disease exclusive to the elderly, or those with pre-existing illnesses. Myocarditis hits all ages — even the healthy, athletic types. It is the third leading cause of Sudden Death in children and teens. So, please, share this awareness. The life of someone you love may depend on it!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/myocarditis/symptoms-causes/syc-20352539

https://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/myocarditis#1

https://www.myocarditisfoundation.org/about-myocarditis/

https://www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/viral

*Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

 

February Is For The Heart

Yes, Valentine’s is approaching … paper hearts, roses, cards, candy, nice dinners, flashy bling and all. But it’s also American Heart Month. So, this month, we are going to focus on heart health. Why? Because, fun and games aside, Cupid can’t do anything for your physical well-being. Awareness, on the other hand, can literally save lives!

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Heart disease can happen to anyone — even children. According to data from the CDC, approximately 1% (40,000) of babies born each year have a Congenital Heart Defect (CHD). And 25% of these are critical. Others surface, during childhood or teen years. Some of the most common heart conditions in children are listed as either “congenital” (present from birth) or “acquired” (developed after birth). Some of these conditions are hereditary. And they require special healthcare needs.

If your child was born healthy, you want that good health to continue into adulthood. The best way to achieve that is by teaching healthy habits, now. Here are some great tips for starting:

  • Introduce your child to healthy eating, i.e. set mealtimes, limit snacking, keep junk food out of the house, eat family dinners, and shop/cook with your kids.
  • Encourage fun physical activity.
  • Teach the dangers of smoking & vaping, early.
  • Teach them how to manage their stress.
  • Schedule regular medical exams for your child with his/her pediatrician.

Last but not least, remember that lifestyle risk factors can have a negative impact on the health of your child/teen and you, i.e. obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, vaping, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. There is a direct relationship between these risks and developing heart disease. Medical research has the statistics to prove it. And there is no better role-model than you. So, teach them well!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/heartdefects/data.html

http://www.secondscount.org/pediatric-center/conditions-children#.XjHvMo7YrnE

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/heartdefects/features/children-heart-conditions-special-care.html

https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=prevention-of-heart-disease-starts-in-childhood-1-2073

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/5/e20172607

https://www.ottawaheart.ca/heart-condition/inherited-cardiac-conditions-genetic-disorders

https://www.acc.org/about-acc/press-releases/2019/03/07/10/03/ecigarettes-linked-to-heart-attacks-coronary-artery-disease-and-depression

https://blog.connectionsacademy.com/teach_kids_heart_healthy_habits/

*Photo by Anna Kolosyuk on Unsplash

 

 

Treatment Outside The Box: Homeopathy

Brrr! The frigid temperatures of winter … the gusty wind … the snow … the ice … have a way of going right through you. For many, their joints stiffen and ache. For others, their entire body feels like its consumed by pain. The intensified symptoms are frustrating and stressful. It makes a lot of patients ask themselves, “Is there something more that I can do?” Maybe, there is. It’s called Homeopathic Therapy.

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This is nothing new. Homeopathy is a medical system that was developed, in Germany, back in the 1700’s. It’s commonly used in many European countries. But it has never achieved that level of popularity in the U.S. Does it work? A 6-year study conducted in an outpatient-setting in the UK revealed that 70.7% of patients involved in the study had positive health changes. Still, Homeopathy remains somewhat controversial. Perhaps, mysterious?

Homeopathy is often part of Naturopathy (the belief that diseases can be treated without medication).  Doctors who practice this holistic system of medicine are called  “Homeopaths“. Since Homeopathy training is not included in typical MD degree programs, doctors who are interested in providing this care must pursue additional training. Homeopathic practitioners also provide this treatment. They do not have medical degrees, but their educational background is in science. They do graduate-level training, complete a residency, earn certification and get a licensure.

Homeopathy is based on two unconventional theories:

  • “Like cures like” is the theory that a disease can be cured by a substance that produces similar symptoms in healthy people.
  •  “Law of minimum dose” is the theory that the lower the dose of the medication, the greater its effectiveness. 

Homeopathic products come from plants, minerals, or animals. Treatments are individualized for the patient and their specific illness. According to a 2012 survey, by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), approximately 5M adults and 1M children use this type of treatment in the U.S. In 2017, the FDA proposed a new risk-based enforcement approach to homeopathic products. This approach calls for more scrutiny of products. 

Some of the Chronic illnesses that can be treated with Homeopathy are:

  • Migraines
  • Depression
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia Syndrome

It is important to note that every patient is different. The treatment that some respond well to, others may not. We see this also in conventional medical treatment. There are no guarantees in life. Most of us learned that lesson, by the time we reached adulthood.

If you are interested in learning more about Homeopathy, you can read the links provided below. You can and should also discuss this with your physician. Homeopathy is considered, by most medical doctors, as part of Complementary and Alternative medicine (CAM). He or she can discuss the options available, in your area. If not, those who live in North America can contact the North American Society of Homeopaths online at https://homeopathy.org/ for assistance. Sometimes, the path to feeling better and living more fully involves treatment outside the box! 

 

 

Reference Links:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16296912

https://www.webmd.com/balance/what-is-homeopathy#1

https://nccih.nih.gov/health/homeopathy#hed1

NASH | North American Society of Homeopaths

Fibromyalgia (2008)

https://nccih.nih.gov/research/statistics/2007/camsurvey_fs1.htm

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/homeopathy

*Photo by Filip Bunkens on Unsplas

Building Your Support Team

Once you are diagnosed with a Chronic illness, life comes at you fast. There are tests, doctors, medications, procedures, treatment, etc., to be discussed … decided upon … and juggled. And the best way to manage it all is to build a “Support Team”. But how does that work? Who makes the cut? Let’s talk about that …

 

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Family and friends can be wonderful things. But, in reality, not all families provide strong support systems and not all friends are up to the task. This is your health that we are talking about. Anyone with a Chronic illness will tell you that managing your condition is vital. Your privacy is also involved. Which brings us back to who makes the cut:

  • Doctors are a given.
  • Disease Information. This will help you to make decisions & build your team.
  • Therapists and/or Nutritionists may be needed to get you started or even long-term.
  • Best Buds, i.e. spouse, partner, family, friends, a neighbor, or even a co-worker. People you can count on to help you emotionally and/or physically. This should be  dependable & responsible individuals. They should also know how to practice discretion. If you have more than one in your life … “Yea!”
  • Support Groups can be found in most areas — even online (hint, hint, hint). These are very beneficial if your Best Buds are limited or not living close-by.
  • A Good Pharmacy & I lean toward national chains. If you forget to pack a prescription, lose one, etc., it’s easier to get it replaced. Most offer mail-delivery, too.

Building your team may sound like a daunting task, but it’s not as difficult as you may think. Specialists and surgeons will be referred, if needed, by your physician. This is also true for therapists, nutritionists, etc. Your physician can provide information about your disease, too. And there’s a wealth of good information on sites like Mayo Clinic, WebMD, CDC, etc. Your “Best Buds” are the easiest to pick, because you know them and they know you. You also know their strengths and weaknesses. Some will be better for a specific task than others. So, talk to them. Discuss your condition as well as any help you may need, i.e. transportation, errands, watching the kids for a couple of hours, etc. Support Groups may be of interest to you, or they may not. The choice is yours and depends solely upon your needs and preferences. A good pharmacy is something that you don’t really think about, until it becomes a constant part of your life. If you don’t have one, now is the time to locate one. With any Chronic illness, you will need it. This is your new normal.

It’s a lot to take in. I know. Once diagnosed, you can easily feel overwhelmed … scared … frustrated … depressed … even angry. That’s why your support team is so important. Together, you can and will effectively manage your condition. Millions do so, every day. Last but not least, try not to let your imagination get the best of you in the worst of ways. Don’t worry yourself over things that may never happen. Don’t allow worst-case scenarios to keep you awake at night. Cross that bridge, when and if you come to it. You have better things to do, than dwell on the negatives. Prioritize. Focus. Embrace optimism. And live!

 

Reference Links:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions

https://www.webmd.com/

https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/index.htm

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/groups/chronic-illness

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-07-groups-boost-health-chronic-conditions.html

http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/Changes/SelfManagement.aspx

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000602.htm

https://www.caregiver.org/resources-health-issue-or-condition

8 Ways to Build a Support System When You Feel Defeated and Alone

*Photo by Sheri Hooley on Unsplash

January Is Thyroid Awareness Month

This time of year is famous for bringing sore throats, aches, hoarseness, fatigue, etc. That’s why most us buy an over-the-counter medication, a few cough drops and keep going. If it gets worse, we may even opt for our granny’s chicken soup and a warm blanket. But we seldom think of these symptoms as being something more … like a Chronic illness.  Let’s change that …

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An estimated 20M Americans have some form of thyroid disease. And as many as 60% of them are unaware that they are sick. That’s a little scary, but statistically accurate. The thyroid gland is located in the middle of the lower neck. Although the gland is rather small, it’s reach is a big one. Why? Because the thyroid produces a hormone that influences every cell, tissue and organ in the body!

Most patients are female. In fact, women are five to eight times more likely to have thyroid problems than men. Which in no way gets all of you guys off-the-hook, so pay attention. This can strike at any age. Even infants have been diagnosed with the condition. And symptoms of thyroid disease vary depending on what form the patient has.

For Hypothyroidism, the symptoms are:

  • Fatigue
  • Sensitivity to cold
  • Tingling and numbness in the hands
  • Reduced heart rate
  • Dry skin and hair
  • Development of a goiter

For Hyperthyroidism, the symptoms are:

  • Weight loss, despite an increased appetite
  • Increased heart rate, palpitations, higher blood pressure, nervousness 
  • More frequent bowel movements, diarrhea
  • Muscle weakness, trembling hands
  • Development of a goiter

For Thyroid Cancer, the symptoms are:

  • A lump that can be felt through the skin of the neck
  • Changes in voice, hoarseness
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Pain in the neck and throat
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck

If you have had a prolonged period of experiencing any of the above symptoms, it’s time to see a doctor. So, please, make an appointment. You may need to be referred to an ENT (Ear, Nose & Throat doctor) or an Endocrinologist for treatment. The good news is that thyroid disease is manageable. Thyroid cancer, though rare in the U.S., is also very treatable with a high success rate.

January is Thyroid Awareness Month. The more that we know, the healthier that we become. So, help spread the word. 

 

Reference Links:

General Information/Press Room

https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/thyroid-disease-symptoms-and-treatment

https://www.webmd.com/women/understanding-thyroid-problems-symptoms

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/thyroid-cancer/symptoms-causes/syc-20354161

https://www.webmd.com/women/guide/understanding-thyroid-problems-basics#2

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/thyroid-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/survival-rates.html

*Photo by Karissa Seeger on Unsplash